Even Cybercriminals Get Spammed

hates spamEvery one hates spam. And it turns out, cyber criminals have to put up with annoying automated messages for all sorts of dodgy goods too.

“WE ARE FIRST HAND SELLERS!” cried one bit of spam sent over XMPP, a chat protocol commonly used by dark web drug dealers, hackers, and, it seems, spammers. (For this situation, the message was from a merchant offering stolen charge card information.) “WE DON’T RESELL SOMEBODY STUFF LIKE MANY OTHERS DO, THAT IS WHY WE CAN HAVE LOWER PRICES THAN OTHERS HAVE! WE HAVE ONE RULE: OUR CUSTOMER IS OUR BOSS!”

In the course of recent months, I’ve gotten a consistent uptick in these kind of messages at whatever point I sign into my informing program. That doesn’t really imply that these spammers have quite recently begun pushing out their messages altogether; most likely my XMPP handle was quite recently gotten by more merchants and added to their rundown of potential clients, for reasons unknown.

Different messages publicize a Russian-talking site that cases to offer an extensive variety of elusive medications, for example, 2C-B and 2C-I, and more customary opiates like methamphetamine or cocaine. One of the messages publicizes cannabis, purportedly for therapeutic reasons.

“It’s a great opportunity to experience treatment,” the message peruses, as per a Google interpretation. More spam identifies with a Russian Tor concealed administration purportedly offering MDMA and LSD.

As far as I can tell, the majority of the messages publicized medications. Be that as it may, one advert incorporated a video of an available to be purchased botnet in real life, alongside the gathered proprietor’s XMPP address.

“BEST PRICES ON MARKET—STARTING 8$ on WORLDWIDE!” composes the spammer offering stolen charge card information.

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A portion of the XMPP accounts seem to have been made particularly to spam individuals, with usernames, for example, “xxsend.”

Obviously, XMPP spam is not another marvel. In 2015, XMPP clients saw a rush of spam and were searching for approaches to stop it, and a month ago, somebody on the Cisco bolster discussion griped about spontaneous XMPP messages. A fast script for conveying XMPP spam is likewise accessible on Github.

Gratefully, one Russian-talking vender even lets those irritated by the consistent spamming to expel themselves from the mailing list by and large. Beneficiaries clearly simply need to answer to the merchant with the words “stopspam.”

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